Pruth Bay and God’s Pocket with a few whales along the way

Somewhere there’s a tiny tractor.

Texture, texture, texture.

Dah dit dah dah dit dit

Even the trailside privy was a work of art.

Time to go. Looking due east to Fitzhugh Sound. Six miles of seaplane runway. Why RCAF seaplane base Shearwater was not built here instead leaves one pondering military intelligence.

There be monsters in these deeps.

Humpbacks galore.

A bubble net brigade. A humbling experience for the spectator.

Scarlett Point Light Station. what a great job…if it weren’t for all that damned grass to mow. Safe in off Queen Charlotte Sound.

God’s Pocket

Supper for poor sailorfolk

God’s Pocket

Where did this name come from? Why not God’s Sock, or God’s Knickers? And which pocket is it? One in his jeans? In the back, next to where the farts come out? Jill tells me I’ll find an answer. I think the name has to do with a sense of safety, a tiny place snugly out of the vicious winds that can blast this area. It is a dent in the shoreline of Hurst Island, just northwest of Port Hardy. It is not particularly notable yet provides fair holding ground and reasonable shelter in most winds. There is nothing here except a base for eco-tourism. There are no stores, no bright lights and no place to go ashore. Yet it is a name which yachties love to drop invariably in a clubhouse anywhere south. There’ll be a scrum of folks with wine glasses in hand and this name will float out repeatedly. “Oh yes it is lovely there. The problem is you see there’s no place to take Fifi ashore in God’s Pocket and she just won’t do her business on the afterdeck.

Then the widget spinner on the ice-maker broke and we had to go back to Port Hardy and wait three days for new parts to be flown in. You just don’t dare go into the north country without a reliable ice maker. Nonetheless you simply must stop at God’s Pocket. Be sure to anchor in the middle so there’s no room for anyone else.” I imagined an affected British accent with a Worshington undertone as I wrote the above.

Actually, we had the tiny anchorage all to ourselves. That seems odd, it is usually crowded in summer with some huge gin palace in the middle, sweeping around the rocky bight because it has far too much anchor chain out. Everyone else ends up in the kelp beds trying to stay clear of the lunging Fart Parkerson.

Enough sarcasm. We made our way here from Goose Island via Hakaii Pass and a night in Pruth Bay at the top of Calvert Island. It is a stunning place with amazing beaches. On our way south from there we made our way down Fitzhugh Sound passing dozens of Humpback whales along the way. The crossing of Queen Charlotte Sound was the easiest ever. We’ll stop in Port Hardy to get provisions before moving ever southward. Our trip is again best described with photos.

There are no public docks in Pruth Bay. All the facilities belong to the Hakaii Research Institute, developed in the facilities of a former fishing lodge. This sexy-to-someone boat looked out of place to me.

So did this one. Note some of the crew standing on the drop-down transom, with the deck chairs. She’s flying a Danish ensign.

The Hakaii Institute.
A very tidy operation. They very graciously allow access to the beaches via a lovely path and even provide wifi.

There are five broad, sweeping, stunning beaches of fine white sand. When dry it squeaks underfoot. I’ve previously posted photos of the vistas here during a visit last year. This time I focused on details.

Dense rainforest grows on solid rock right o the edge of the sand and sea.

It was one of those days when there was a photo everywhere.

A portal to the other side.

Never look back, or you shall have to return.

Lovely, but too bloody cold for swimming

The darting, sprinting shorebirds are always fascinating.

Deer tracks in the shifting sand.

The beach dunes are held with flowers, sedges and grass.

I could have taken photos until last light.

See what I mean?

Everything seems sculpted and carefully arranged.

Use sun screen.

Stranded

Sand script

CLICK ON PHOTOS TO ENLARGE

3 responses to “Pruth Bay and God’s Pocket with a few whales along the way

  1. I’ve been rushing through tasks, trying to get through my too-long to-do list so we can get away on our boat by tomorrow morning – and wouldn’t you know it, your four posts suddenly arrived in my inbox. Impossible to stay on task!! Your adventures and images grabbed my attention. Love the humpbacks, all the images of Goose Group, and Tribal group (I remember photographing some of the same views)….Klemtu doesn’t look to have changed much since we were there.

    Glad you are getting this time afloat to savour these places, and that Jill is along too. Now, I absolutely must get back on task – reluctantly!

  2. Wonderful photos and travel experience. I had to laugh hard at a previous blog when I felt so envious of the isolated anchorages, beautiful beaches and crisp clear blue skies. And then there was the picture of Jill curled up on the foredeck for an afternoon nap in the sunshine. But then I realised that she had on three layers of fleece, long pants and a hat and I thought ‘where would I rather be?’….

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s