Into The Jigsaw Jungle

Good Bye Ladysmith Life is a journey and a new adventure begins

Good Bye Ladysmith
Life is a journey and a new adventure begins

I like to mention occasionally that the amazing coastline of British Columbia runs Northwestward to Alaska and ascends through four hundred nautical miles of latitude. Within that distance we have over seventeen thousand nautical miles of shoreline. There is an intricate labyrinth of islands, islets, and inlets. It is as if someone has dumped a monstrous jigsaw puzzle out and nobody gives a toss about fitting anything together. There is a writhing network of very long dead-end inlets, or fiords if you prefer, and also interconnected waterways of seething tidal waters that are studded with hungry reefs. Prudent navigation and local knowledge are essential.

A Cumulus Eclipse The gods seem to smile as I head northward

A Cumulus Eclipse
The gods seem to smile as I head northward

As you travel up the coast by boat the geography and forest vegetation change rapidly with noticeable new features. The water becomes clear, cold, jade green and rich with marine life. The presence of people diminishes quickly once north of the Strait Of Georgia and those who do live there often have characters of strength and individuality. I feel at home and whole once clear of the South coast and its complexity of sprawling population in the prime retirement zone of Canada. The ordeal of the boat trailer as described in the previous blog underscored my growing inclination to find a simpler world. Pre-seniors like myself compete fiercely for menial employment which rewards a lifetime of experience for token remuneration.

Careening on the beach for bottom maintenance among the wrecks of Dogpatch in Ladysmith Harbour

Careening on the beach for bottom maintenance among the wrecks of Dogpatch in Ladysmith Harbour. The N or King is a former WWII mine sweeper which also had an illustrious career as a fishpacker. It seems nearly every other fisherman claims to have crewed on this boat at some time.

At the same time I have uncovered a job possibility as a marine technician in a place called Shearwater which is on Denny Island located between mainland Canada and Haida Gwaii. It is a beautiful area, tiny within a huge archipelago of pristine wilderness. You can travel an entire day without meeting other boats and little, if any, evidence of human presence. I tied up some loose ends, pooled my limited resources and sailed away. Jill, my long-suffering wife, gave me tremendous support despite the demands of her very demanding career. For the time being at least she’s got me out of her hair with only Jack the dog to trip over at the end of the day. Meanwhile I’m steeling myself for the transition between being my own man and jumping to the edicts of someone else.

Boats Of Note Seafire is on the left inside the break water, then a not-so-shining example of why we pay the big dollars to ride BC Ferries and disguised immediately above the power pole is the tug 'Bandera' southbound with a log tow. I've spent many weeks of my life aboard this boat. It  is where I had an accident which drastically altered my life and saw the installation of half a plastic heart. "Bionics rule!"

Boats Of Note
Seafire is on the left inside the break water, then a not-so-shining example of why we pay the big dollars to ride BC Ferries and disguised immediately above the power pole is the tug ‘Bandera’ southbound with a log tow. I’ve spent many weeks of my life aboard this boat. It is where I had an accident which drastically altered my life and saw the installation of half a plastic heart. “Bionics rule!”

Because I was northbound the wind, of course, was from the Northwest, on the nose as usual. I visited with friends in Silva Bay then headed across the strait to crawl up the mainland coast into the wind. I was disgusted by the explosion of condominiums and suburban development and happy to heading away from this insidious cancer. After a night anchored by Vananda I stopped in Powell River for fuel. Despite a massive downsizing in the forest industry the town struggles on. The locals are very friendly, the views are spectacular and real estate prices are quite reasonable. I asked one fellow for directions to an auto parts store and was promptly offered a ride. The community is like that. I left a black streak on the hull from the fuel dock fenders and while scrubbing it off, the young lady on duty offered me warm water for my hands! I decided to break for a last meal ashore and found myself enjoying the best burger I’ve ever had in Carter’s Cafe On Marine. It’s just a few steps up from The BC Ferry terminal and public wharf. Run by two lovely ladies the cafe is a spot I’m happy to recommend.

The wind eased as I motored on and with a gale warning still posted I was determined to cover as many miles as possible. For some reason marine weather broadcasts love to employ the term “Quasi-stationary”. Quasi, of course means nearly or almost and the determined use of it is certainly quasi. So I travelled northward under the influence of a quasi-stationary front.

Carter's Café. Great food served by lovely people.

Carter’s Café. Great food served by lovely people.

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Their Neighbour

After a long night in Church House where the night wind against the tide from Yuculta Rapids held old ‘Seafire’ broadside to the elements. The anchor chain dragged and rumbled across

Yet another sign in Powell River... too close to the bone for me!

Yet another sign in Powell River… too close to the bone for me!

all she needs is love, and a new engine. What a little beauty!

All she needs is love, and a new engine.
What a little beauty!

the rocky bottom and I was up early to tackle the rapids ahead. The Yucultas, Dent and Green Point Rapids slid behind in a few hours and after The Wellbore Rapids I was bashing into the promised rising Westerly wind. Sometimes, it takes up to three days to move a log tow through these notorious tidal bores. I found a calm anchorage in one of the two Jackson Bays within Topaz Harbour and set about clearing a blocked fuel line from the starboard tank. That took until midnight and after a candlelight dinner of Dollarama couscous, at first light, about 04:30, I was on my way northward.

Ten PM sunset over Sonora Island from Church House anchorage

Ten PM sunset over Sonora Island from Church House anchorage

A few hours later

A few hours later

Now THAT'S a leaf blower! A Hughs 500 helicopter and a Turbo Beaver at a private home on Stuart Island, Yuculta Rapids

Now THAT’S a leaf blower! A Hughs 500 helicopter and a Turbo Beaver at a private home on Stuart Island, Yuculta Rapids

The Westerly winds which blow down Johnstone Strait can be quite vicious. The seas are horrible when the tide is ebbing against that sort of blow. Westerly winds tend to build during the day and then ease as the sun sets but I was determined to make it to Port Harvey where I could go many miles out of my way to trace a tortuous track northwards which would bring me out slightly north of Port Hardy on the mainland side of Queen Charlotte Strait. I’d need to cross to Port Hardy for fuel and groceries before pressing on. Despite a forecast of 30 knots of wind on the nose I continued on past Port Harvey until the end of Johnstone Strait at Blackney Passage. The wind was easing so I continued on past Alert Bay ending up anchoring for the night in Beaver Harbour, only a few miles from Port Hardy. I was elated with my progress and nostalgic for the days when I plied these waters on tugboats.

Mermaid Bay, Dent Rapids This is where log tows are tied while their tugs wait for a favourable tide through the next set of rapids. All the boats erect a sign, hopefully higher than all the others. I've spent many long nights here.

Mermaid Bay, Dent Rapids This is where log tows are tied while their tugs wait for a favourable tide through the next set of rapids. All the boats erect a sign, hopefully higher than all the others. I’ve spent many long nights here.

The "Ugly House" Milly Island near Port Neville on Johnstone Strait

The “Ugly House”
Milly Island near Port Neville on Johnstone Strait

It has been fifteen years since my work boat days ended but memories flooded back. I recalled how in Lewis Channel a skipper named Cliff (who could never catch enough fish or take enough crabs) had managed to lasso a deer swimming across the channel. In Teakerne Arm we arrived at 02:00 to pick up some log booms. There was a fishing boat tied to the booms and when it became clear that they were losing their moorage spot there was an angry, staccato tirade from the Asian family aboard, prompted by an elderly matriarch. They were determined that they were there first despite our explanation that we had tied our booms there days earlier. We resolutely connected our booms to the rest of our log tow and with a cheery “See you in Vancouver” headed south. The fishing boat soon untied and went its own way.

"Tings all over" Taking some lumps in Johnstone Strait

“Tings all over”
Taking some lumps along the way

Towing logs through the Wellbore Rapids at daybreak we came upon a middle-aged lady in a kayak. She had been camping on a stretch of beach when rousted by bears. It turned out that she had paddled from Seattle to Alaska and was on her way home. I remember her when some yachter boasts to me about a minor passage as if it were an epic voyage.

Beautiful downtown Alert Bay. Once home of the world's tallest totem pole it was also in the Guinness book of Records for having the most taxis per capita

Beautiful downtown Alert Bay. Once home of the world’s tallest totem pole it was also in the Guinness book of Records for having the most taxis per capita

On another trip I was in the wheelhouse as the mate bantered with another boat in the proximity of Milly Island in Johnstone Strait. There is a house built on the island and one of the mates was braying on about what an ugly structure it was. Suddenly the home owner spoke out on the VHF. “Look buddy, your tugboat ain’t no thing of beauty either!”

Beachcombing. To progress against wind or tide hugging the shore is a game of nerves and intimate local knowledge of every rock. It is not for the faint of heart. Many log tows make their progress this way, even in the dark.

Beachcombing.
To progress against wind or tide hugging the shore is a game of nerves and intimate local knowledge of every rock. It is not for the faint of heart.
Many log tows make their progress this way, even in the dark.

I rather like the sight of the house and its posture of independence, especially after that particular conversation.

Along way home...and we're just getting started. Looking south down Johnstone Strait.

A long way home…and we’re just getting started.
Looking south down Johnstone Strait.

Just south of Milly Island is Kelsey Bay. The boiling tides in that area will make passage extremely difficult to the point that one night a deckhand and myself renamed the place, “Suction city.” We fought the tide rip that night for hours. Mu experiences in these particular waters inspire as much respect as the dreaded Seymour Narrows. Across from Kelsey Bay is Yorke Island which hides the amazing secret of a massive artillery fortress. Perched on the top of the island it nestles in the trees where it was built during WWII to fend off Admiral Yamamoto and the boys, should they arrive. Even many seasoned watermen aren’t aware of the huge installation. The old fort is probably most famous locally as the site of a hippie commune in the sixties. Peace Man!

Morning, Beaver Harbour near Port Hardy

Morning, Beaver Harbour near Port Hardy

Immediately north of Yorke Island is a bald rock called Fanny Island which is a large bald granite rock clearly visible and marked with a flashing light. It is a well-known check point for commercial marine traffic. One very dark but calm night, while passing nearby with a log tow, the VHF burst into life. “FUCK!. I mean Mayday, Mayday! HOLY FUCK WE’RE SINKING!” A fishing boat had hit Fanny Island. Encumbered with a massive log tow we couldn’t rush to assist but I turned on all our deck lights and summoned the engineer to break out the pumps. While the stricken vessel limped the long mile across to us I relayed the Mayday to the Coast Guard. A Coast Guard inflatable arrived an hour and a half later, its three crewman looking like orange popsicles after their high-speed winter night cruise up from Campbell river. They relayed another pump from a passing tug. We’d already rigged a collision mat over the puncture in the boat’s hull and had two pumps going to keeps things afloat. That effort, I surmise, was perhaps aided by the thick layer of empty beer cans bobbing around in the flooded engine room. Once sufficiently warmed by our galley stove the coast guard crew officiously announced that they would take charge of the sinker. We were only too glad to comply.

The  "Inseine" dock, Port Hardy fish plant

The “Inseine” dock, Port Hardy fish plant.

Mixing work with pleasure boats. some of the moorage in Port Hardy

Mixing work with pleasure boats. Some of the moorage in Port Hardy

Thar be monsters at these docks! I don't know what the hell it was, but I sure wish I could swim like that!

Thar be monsters at these docks! I don’t know what the hell it was, but I sure wish I could swim like that!

The collection. an admirable contempt for authority in Port Hardy

The collection. An admirable contempt for authority in Port Hardy

My kind of house. Adequate, sturdy, simple and right beside the sea.

My kind of house. Adequate, sturdy, simple and right beside the sea.

Goletas Channel, northbound from Port Hardy. Did the Spanish explorers, who named these waters, wonder if this might be the beginning of the fabled Northwest Passage?

Goletas Channel, northbound from Port Hardy. Did the Spanish explorers, who named these waters, wonder if this might be the beginning of the fabled Northwest Passage?

Now entering Queen Charlotte Strait, I recalled how this reef-studded body of water is sometimes known as the “Rock Garden” by skippers who have made stormy transits in the dark of this ragged corner of the North Pacific. There is ample material to write about. I’m preparing to publish a sequel to ‘The Water Rushing By’ which is now available from Amazon as either a p.o.d. paperback or as an e-book from Kindle.

A cruise ship in Queen Charlotte Strait. One salmon says to the other, "Look at all the canned people!"

A cruise ship in Queen Charlotte Strait. One salmon says to the other, “Look at all the canned people!”

Port Hardy clings to life after the decimation of the local mining, fishing and forest industries. Eco-tourism and, like it or not, aquaculture seem to have become the cornerstone of the local economy. Buying some provisions, one of my items was a vacuum-packed pork hock. I joked about how big a pork hawk must be if it can haul a pig away. The cashier didn’t miss a blink, “Maybe they’re even big enough to pack you away!” I stopped for lunch in a local bar and restaurant and noticed a sign admonishing clients not to smoke within the proximity of the establishment. Including a list of possible massive fines, it warned that “Jails isn’t a comfy place!” At the marina where I was moored, the clerk in the liquor store worried about how I was dealing with the “Heat.” It was a scorching twenty-two degrees with a cold, damp breeze blowing in from the sea. It was also worried that there was too much wind to leave to dock and then as I pulled away, I had to wait for a passing fishboat named “Eastern Sunset.” Strange, very strange. I moved on and spent the night in a popular little bight called God’s Pocket, then headed into the grey beyond early next morning.

Downtown God's Pocket. Thassit! I've always wondered where Devil's Pocket is.

Downtown God’s Pocket.Thassit! I’ve always wondered where Devil’s Pocket is.

 

THE G SPOT A log tower's mark in god's pocket

THE G SPOT
A log tower’s mark in God’s Pocket

THAR!... Yep you've got it! Grey whale ahead

THAR!… Yep you’ve got it!
Grey whale ahead.

Dive, dive, dive! Now you think you saw him, then you begin to wonder.

Dive, dive, dive!
Now you think you saw him, then you begin to wonder.

Queen Charlotte Sound is bounded on the North by Hecate Strait which is the body of water separating Haida Gwaii (still charted as the Queen Charlotte Islands.) On the Southern end of the sound is Queen Charlotte Strait and various other areas also bear Charlotte’s name. To further thicken the stew, the passage between Bowen Island and Horseshoe Bay, near Vancouver, also carries her name. When King Edward III married her in the eighteenth century her maiden name was Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Electress of Hanover. She bore randy old Ed fifteen children so perhaps that is why this area, with all of its islands, is so eagerly named after her. Thank God we don’t have to employ her entire long handle each time we refer to this area. What a mouthful that would be on the radio!

Something missing? A Grand and elegant US-registered yacht. Too bad he didn't have any money left over to buy a Canadian courtesy flag. It is an ultimate nautical rudeness not fly the ensign of the foreign country when in its waters.

Something missing?
A Grand and elegant US-registered yacht.
Too bad he didn’t have any money left over to buy a Canadian courtesy flag.
It is an ultimate nautical rudeness to not fly the ensign of a foreign country when in its waters.

My crossing was uneventful and typical with the open-ocean swell shuddering in under local tide slop and spastic bursts of wind. Rolls of light fog and drizzle welcomed me to the mid-coast. I gazed out onto the broad grey, open curving horizon and ached to head that way. My mind began to clear and I began to scrawl quick thoughts in my journal. Journal? Now there’s a good sign, it’s been a while since I did that. Where I can read my writing I find lines like “He spent money like a sailor and played guitar like an African” or “drowning in the waters you walk on.” Dunno what either one is about but someday it may blossom into sensible eloquence. Writing and photography, I find, require being able to grab to the glory of the moment and saving it for future edification. At least with a camera, there’s not a lot to interpret later on.

Scarlett Point light, Balaclava Island. Now a rare manned light station. I received a hearty wave from someone in the house on the right.

Scarlett Point light, Balaclava Island. Now a rare manned light station. I received a hearty wave from someone in the house on the right.

How about this? It was scratched out somewhere north of Egg Island.

I feel the ocean swell’s rise

As my happy boat begins to glide

This passage fills me with pride

Because I’m doing what few men do,

Exactly what I want to.

Land's end The northern tip of Pine Island

Land’s end
The northern tip of Pine Island

Growlers in the Rock Garden. Queen Charlotte Strait is not a place to be sleepy in the dark and/or in heavy weather.

Growlers in the Rock Garden. Queen Charlotte Strait is not a place to be sleepy in the dark or in heavy weather, or both.

The open horizon Beyond Nawhitti  Bar The urge to head that way was hard to resist, Mexico is just down there, three weeks away.

The open horizon Beyond Nawhitti Bar
The urge to head that way was hard to resist, Mexico is just down there, three weeks away.

The crack out back. Egg Island from the north. The original light station was swept away by a Tsunami without trace several decades ago. Sleep tight.

The crack out back. Egg Island from the north. The original light station was swept away by a Tsunami without trace several decades ago. Sleep tight.

Addenbroke Light Station Fitz Hugh Sound

Addenbroke Light Station
Fitz Hugh Sound

Motor-sailing northward in Fitz Hugh Sound.  The clear warm day was most unusual.

Motor-sailing northward in Fitz Hugh Sound. The clear warm day was most unusual.

Southbound. The Alaska State ferry 'Columbia' passing Namu

Southbound.
The Alaska State ferry ‘Columbia’ passing Namu

In one of a thoussnd secret anchorages in northern waters. Can  you smell wood smoke, hear drums, see dugout canoes?

In one of a thousand secret anchorages in northern waters. Can you smell wood smoke, hear drums, see dugout canoes?

A natural totem. After ten pm, looking out to Hakaii Pass

A natural totem. It’s still daylight after ten pm. Looking out to Hakaii Pass.

Once into the shelter of Calvert Island the remains of the day turned warm and clear and calm as I motor-sailed northward up the broad waters of Fitz Hugh Sound. At the northeast tip of Hecate Island I found a calm secluded anchorage just at the edge of Hakai Pass. The ancient trees lean out from the worn granite where they cling tenaciously, their brine-burned branches festooned with moss and hanging kelp. It is my last night before arriving in Shearwater and the frantic frustrations of a new job and settling into a new community. For the moment, no-one else on the planet knows where I am.

Haida Moon

Haida Moon

Still Waters Nobody knows where I am and it's all mine!

Still Waters
Nobody knows where I am and it’s all mine!

Bliss.

The sea finds out everything you did wrong”…. Francis Stokes

3 responses to “Into The Jigsaw Jungle

  1. Wonderful to lie here under the tropical moon and reminisce about being in an anchrage close to Egg Island while the lighthouse recorded 80 kn of wind from the SE. Doesn’t look like you had those conditions as all your pictures look as though they were taken in someone’s dream of the PNW as it should be i.e. Sunny, lapus blue and all with perfect sailing conditions. You sure know how to spin a yarn!

  2. Thanks Tony! I’ve now corrected all the typos.
    Fred

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